Today being the 25th of April serves as World Malaria Day and this year’s theme is tagged ‘A Push for Prevention.’

An average Nigerian has his or her sleep cut short on a daily basis by the invasion of mosquitoes roaming about the house. Although many solutions have been created to eradicate this invasion but never permanently.

When they circle your head, looking for a place to land and bite, their buzz sounds louder when they close to your ear. Both male and female mosquitoes buzz, since they both have wings, but you probably won’t notice the whine of the males, because they don’t want to drink your blood.

It is said that mosquitoes have been around for more than 30 million years. And it seems that, during those millions of years, mosquitoes have been honing their skills and today they are now experts at finding people to bite. They are said to have a battery of sensors designed to track their prey.

Almost everyone has had the unpleasant experience of being bitten by a mosquito. Mosquito bites can cause skin irritation through an allergic reaction to the mosquito’s saliva – this is what causes the red bump and itching.

But a more serious consequence of some mosquito bites may be transmission of serious diseases and viruses such as malaria

Despite the use of mosquito insecticides, that is, the use of sprays and chemicals used to scare away and kill a these insects, they always find a way to return back and cause more havoc to whoever they deem fit.

Over the years many deaths were recorded with the cause being malaria but thankfully there are now  many more measures used to treat affected patients and the death rates are said to have reduced.

World Malaria Day (WMD)

This is an international observance marked every year on 25th April which recognizes global efforts to control malaria . Over 3.3 billion people in 106 countries are at risk of malaria.

In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627,000 deaths, mostly among African children. Asia, Latin America, and to a lesser extent the Middle East and parts of Europe are also affected.

World Malaria Day sprung out of the efforts taking place across the African continent to commemorate Africa Malaria Day

World Malaria Day was established in May 2007 by the 60th session of the World Health Assembly, WHO’s decision-making body. The day was established to provide “education and understanding of malaria” and spread information on “year-long intensified implementation of national malaria-control strategies, including community-based activities for malaria prevention and treatment in endemic areas.”

Prior to the establishment of Africa Malaria Day was held on April 25. Africa Malaria Day began in 2001, one year after the historic Abuja Declaration was signed by 44 malaria-endemic countries at the African Summit on Malaria.

World Malaria Day allows for corporations (such as ExxonMobil) , multinational organizations (such as Malaria No More) and grassroots organizations (such as Mosquitoes Suck Tour) globally to work together to bring awareness to malaria and advocate for policy changes

Events marking World Malaria Day 2014 in Nigeria included a demonstration of anti-malarial bed nets, testing and distribution of anti-malarial drugs, seminars on progress in combating and controlling malaria, and the inclusion of African footballers in the campaign to combat malaria.

As of 2016, the Federal Ministry of Health has pledged to end Malaria. The U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria, James F. Entwistle, has pledged continued support and noted the possibility of ending Malaria in Nigeria.

As we mark today, let us all be reminded to try as much as possible to keep our surroundings and homes clean. Making use of treated mosquito nets especially for the young children. Let us fight malaria together as a nation by making the necessary precautions. When ever you begin to feel the symptoms of malaria, make sure you visit a near by hospital for treatments and for a brighter tomorrow.